BOOKKEEPING

Choose the Right Pricing Plans

Our plans are designed to fit your budget without breaking the bank

  • Transaction Volume
  • Bookkeeping Frequency
  • Reporting
  • Accounting Basis
  • Payroll & Benefits
  • Tax Return
  • Financial Statement Review
  • Consultation
  • Established

  • $ 49 .99 /month

  • Transaction Volume
    Up to 75 per month
  • Bookkeeping Frequency
    Quarterly
  • Reporting
    Monthly Financials Income Statement Balance Sheet
  • Accounting Basis
    Cash
  • Payroll & Benefits
    1 Employee - Bi Weekly
  • Tax Return
    25% off Business + Personal Tax Return Filing
  • Financial Statement Review
    By CPA Annually
  • Consultation
    24/7 Email Support
  • POPULAR
  • Growing

  • $ 149 .99 /month

  • Transaction Volume
    Up to 150 per month
  • Bookkeeping Frequency
    Monthly
  • Reporting
    Monthly Financials Income Statement Balance Sheet
  • Accounting Basis
    Cash or Accrual
  • Payroll & Benefits
    6 Employees - Bi Weekly
  • Tax Return
    50% Off Business Tax Return (Forms 1120/1120S/990) + Personal Tax Return Filing
  • Financial Statement Review
    By CPA Monthly
  • Consultation
    24/7 Email Support
  • NEW
  • Scaling

  • $ 249 .99 /month

  • Transaction Volume
    Up to 300 per month
  • Bookkeeping Frequency
    Weekly
  • Reporting
    Monthly Financials Income Statement Balance Sheet
  • Accounting Basis
    Cash or Accrual
  • Payroll & Benefits
    12 Employees - Bi Weekly
  • Tax Return
    1120/1120S/1065/990 Forms Included + Personal Tax Return Filing 1040
  • Financial Statement Review
    By CPA Monthly
  • Consultation
    24/7 Email Support

INCORPORATIONS

Choose the Right Business Type

Compare the important differences of each business structure to decide
which one is right for your company.

LLC

C Corp

S Corp

DBA

Protection

Limited liability protection

LLCs provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. C Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. S Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. Owners have no personal asset protection, which makes them personally liable for business debts.
Managing Your Business

Flexibility in management

LLCs must be member or manager managed according to the terms of the operating agreement. Member managed means the owners of the company manage the company. Manager-managed means the members (or owners) elect one or more managers to manage the company. C Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s). S Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s). The DBA owner may manage the business without restriction. Nonprofits are managed by their board of directors following the regulations set forth in their Bylaws.

Ease of ownership changes

Varies
Changes in ownership of an LLC are dependent on the terms of the operating agreement. Ownership changes in a C Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders. Ownership changes in an S Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders. DBAs cannot make ownership changes.

Perpetual existence

Varies
The life of the LLC is dependent of the terms of the operating agreement. Its existence may be short term or perpetual that survive the death or transfer of the membership interests of the original founders. C Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders. S Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders. DBAs end upon closure of the company or the death of the owner.

Ongoing formalities

Depending on the state of incorporation, an LLC may be required to file an annual report and/or pay franchise fees. After formation, C Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock. After formation, S Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock. There are no ongoing corporate formalities.

Ability to raise capital

Varies
LLCs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to raise capital via bank loans, from its members and various other avenues. Any equity to sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. C Corps may issue many types of stocks, which may be sold to an unlimited number of shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. S Corps may issue one type of stock, which may be sold to a maximum of 100 shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. DBAs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to obtain bank loans.
Tax

Pass-through taxation

LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each member. The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level. S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each shareholder (owner). DBAs are not taxed at the company level. All profit and losses are reported on the personal income tax return of the owner.

Double taxation

LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level. The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level. S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level. DBAs are not taxed at the corporate level.
State Filing Fees

State formation fees

LLCs are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. C Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. S Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. There are required filing fees for DBAs. Fees will vary based on the county and state in which the DBA is filed.

Ongoing compliance fees

Depending on the state of incorporation, reports and fees may be required. An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation. An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation. There are no ongoing compliance fees.
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started

LLC C Corp S Corp DBA
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
Limited liability protection LLCs provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. C Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. S Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts. Owners have no personal asset protection, which makes them personally liable for business debts.
Get Started
Limited liability protection
LLC LLCs provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts.
C Corp C Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts.
S Corp S Corps provide personal asset protection, which shields you from being personally liable for business debts.
DBA Owners have no personal asset protection, which makes them personally liable for business debts.

LLC C Corp S Corp DBA
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
Flexibility in management LLCs must be member or manager managed according to the terms of the operating agreement. Member managed means the owners of the company manage the company. Manager-managed means the members (or owners) elect one or more managers to manage the company. C Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s). S Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s). The DBA owner may manage the business without restriction.
Ease of ownership changes Changes in ownership of an LLC are dependent on the terms of the operating agreement. Ownership changes in a C Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders. Ownership changes in an S Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders. DBAs cannot make ownership changes.
Perpetual existence The life of the LLC is dependent of the terms of the operating agreement. Its existence may be short term or perpetual that survive the death or transfer of the membership interests of the original founders. C Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders. S Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders. DBAs end upon closure of the company or the death of the owner.
Ongoing formalities Depending on the state of incorporation, an LLC may be required to file an annual report and/or pay franchise fees. After formation, C Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock. After formation, S Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock. There are no ongoing corporate formalities.
Ability to raise capital LLCs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to raise capital via bank loans, from its members and various other avenues. Any equity to sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. C Corps may issue many types of stocks, which may be sold to an unlimited number of shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. S Corps may issue one type of stock, which may be sold to a maximum of 100 shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations. DBAs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to obtain bank loans.
Get Started
Flexibility in management
LLC LLCs must be member or manager managed according to the terms of the operating agreement. Member managed means the owners of the company manage the company. Manager-managed means the members (or owners) elect one or more managers to manage the company.
C Corp C Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s).
S Corp S Corps are required to have shareholder elected directors who oversee and elect officers to run the day-to-day operations of the company. The business owner(s) can be the shareholder(s), the director(s) and officer(s).
DBA The DBA owner may manage the business without restriction.
Ease of ownership changes
LLC Changes in ownership of an LLC are dependent on the terms of the operating agreement.
C Corp Ownership changes in a C Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders.
S Corp Ownership changes in an S Corp are easily made through the sell of stock to new or existing shareholders.
DBA DBAs cannot make ownership changes.
Perpetual existence
LLC The life of the LLC is dependent of the terms of the operating agreement. Its existence may be short term or perpetual that survive the death or transfer of the membership interests of the original founders.
C Corp C Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders.
S Corp S Corps are separate entities that survive the death or transfer of stock of the owners and/or major shareholders.
DBA DBAs end upon closure of the company or the death of the owner.
Ongoing formalities
LLC Depending on the state of incorporation, an LLC may be required to file an annual report and/or pay franchise fees.
C Corp After formation, C Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock.
S Corp After formation, S Corps have many ongoing formalities such as writing bylaws, selecting directors, holding initial and annual shareholder meetings, and issuing stock.
DBA There are no ongoing corporate formalities.
Ability to raise capital
LLC LLCs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to raise capital via bank loans, from its members and various other avenues. Any equity to sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations.
C Corp C Corps may issue many types of stocks, which may be sold to an unlimited number of shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations.
S Corp S Corps may issue one type of stock, which may be sold to a maximum of 100 shareholders. Any equity sales to third parties needs to be done in compliance with SEC regulations.
DBA DBAs are not allowed to sell stock but may be able to obtain bank loans.

LLC C Corp S Corp DBA
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
Pass-through taxation LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each member. The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level. S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each shareholder (owner). DBAs are not taxed at the company level. All profit and losses are reported on the personal income tax return of the owner.
Double taxation LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level. The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level. S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level. DBAs are not taxed at the corporate level.
Get Started
Double taxation
LLC LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level.
C Corp The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level.
S Corp S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level.
DBA DBAs are not taxed at the corporate level.
Pass-through taxation
LLC LLCs are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each member.
C Corp The income of the C Corp is taxed at the corporate level and then again at the shareholder level.
S Corp S Corps are not taxed at the corporate level. Instead, all profit and losses are reported with the personal income taxes of each shareholder (owner).
DBA DBAs are not taxed at the company level. All profit and losses are reported on the personal income tax return of the owner.

LLC C Corp S Corp DBA
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
State formation fees LLCs are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. C Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. S Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation. There are required filing fees for DBAs. Fees will vary based on the county and state in which the DBA is filed.
Ongoing compliance fees Depending on the state of incorporation, reports and fees may be required. An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation. An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation. There are no ongoing compliance fees.
Get Started
State formation fees
LLC LLCs are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation.
C Corp C Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation.
S Corp S Corps are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation.
DBA There are required filing fees for DBAs. Fees will vary based on the county and state in which the DBA is filed.
Ongoing compliance fees
LLC LLCs are required to pay formation fees to the state. Fees will vary based on the state of incorporation.
C Corp An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation.
S Corp An annual report and franchise fees are generally due each year along with other reports and fees, which varies depending on the state of incorporation.
DBA There are no ongoing compliance fees.

PAYROLL

Process payroll quickly

You’ll have one low monthly payment. There are no long-term contracts, no hidden or end-of-year fees, and no surprises.

 

TAX

"We believe in building and maintaining your wealth." That is the motto we live and work by. Day in and day out, our quality of work and dedication to our clients is driven by our desire to help you expand and keep your share of wealth.

Our commitment to go beyond the basics and provide value-added services at an affordable cost stems from our mission to build and preserve wealth. While we realize that bookkeeping, accounting, and navigating the vast sea of U.S. tax laws are tedious and timeconsuming tasks, we provide these services at an extremely affordable rate, simply because we realize the opportunity this brings for identifying new business needs and further opportunities for mutual benefit.

We turn numbers into easily actionable data. Our firm realizes the importance of simplifying and organizing data in a way that allows for easy decision making. At CPAplace® we make it easy for you by taking care of all the nittygritty, leaving you with a clear picture of your business’ financial position so that YOU can make the best decisions without being bogged down by convolution and unnecessary time and resource constraints.